Cheap DIY Logic Analyzer with Open Hardware and Open Source Software!

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OpenBench Logic Sniffer is an Open Source Logic Analyzer designed to support SUMP (standard logic analyzer protocol), with built-in USB port to communicate with PC client, which does acts as output device. This is a joint effort of Gadget Factory and Dangerous Prototypes. It costs approx. $50.

 

It is not really a DIY project for the user. The board comes with FPGA bit file programmed into its Xilinx Spartan chip and Firmware loaded into PIC microcontroller. It comes with 8 channel probe.

Features

  • 16 channels at 200MHz sampling rate
  • 32 channels up to 100MHz sampling rate
  • state analysis up to 50MHz using external clock
  • 256KSamples memory
  • noise filter
  • complex serial and parallel trigger with four stages
  • externally available sampling clock to drive add-ons (like ADCs)
  • connects via EIA232/RS232 (works with usb to serial adapters)
  • Java based viewing software (see PC Client for details)
    • I2C & SPI protocol analysis

Logic_SnifferHere is how I connected this to my Linux (Ubuntu/Linux Mint 17.1) machine and use.

1. Ensure that device is detected.

$ lsusb | grep “Logic Sniffer”
Bus 003 Device 004: ID 04d8:fc92 Microchip Technology, Inc. Open Bench Logic Sniffer

2.  Ensure that Serial device is created. It usually creates a serial device as /dev/ttyACM0 (or ttyACM1, etc.). Note down this device name.

$ dmesg | grep cdc_acm
[ 1923.739977] cdc_acm 3-2:1.0: This device cannot do calls on its own. It is not a modem.
[ 1923.740018] cdc_acm 3-2:1.0: ttyACM0: USB ACM device

3. Download latest tar ball from this JAVA Client site. Extract it.

4. Run ./run.sh in the extracted directory. You should have java run time installed already. It should display a simple GUI window. Main Menu -> Capture -> Begin Capture (Ctrl+B). You will see a dialog box to do basic configuration. Select Analyzer Port as device name noted down.

Screenshot from 2015-03-12 14:17:03

Another configuration you may be interested is Sampling rate, which can be adjusted based on your test device system frequency. Here I have selected 1MHz.

Screenshot from 2015-03-12 14:18:09

 

Then click capture to get wave form recorded.

Here is the logic analyzer in action.

open_bench_sample

I have made a small enclosure for this board as shown below using a visiting card plastic box. If you like this box sticker, you may download the one I designed here > Open-Bench-Logic-Sniffer-Label

IMG_20150309_100237

IMG_20150309_100307

 

 

 

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